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dc.contributor.authorMurphy, Michael Roland
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-03T21:19:29Z
dc.date.available2014-03-03T21:19:29Z
dc.date.issued2004-05
dc.identifier.othermurphy_michael_r_200405_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/murphy_michael_r_200405_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/21611
dc.description.abstractApplications of thin films and coatings span the entire gamut of science and technology. As new methods of manufacturing thin films develop, new techniques to study the films must also develop. The work presented in this dissertation demonstrates the effectiveness of Raman and Infrared spectroscopy for the analysis of thin and monomolecular films. In Chapter III, both horizontal attenuated total reflection spectroscopy and Raman microscopy are used for the characterization of a biomimetic film designed for an implantable medical device. HATR FTIR was used to verify the results obtained by Raman microscopy. Infrared analysis is the acknowledged method for determining percent polymerization but due to water interference in the sample, this was not possible. Raman microscopy was verified to be a suitable alternative to infrared spectroscopy for the determination of percent polymerization in these types of samples, thus providing an additional analysis tool for the researcher. Horizontal attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy is used for real-time monitoring of photoinitiated polymerization in Chapter IV. The classical metallocenes, ferrocene and ruthenocene, as well as benzoyl-substituted versions of each are investigated as anionic photoinitiators. The use of HATR real-time monitoring allows for the determination of percent polymerization at any point during the reaction as well as providing data that can be used to calculate the rate of polymerization. The use of the metallocenes as photoinitiators provides for an enormous reduction in the amount of solvent necessary for the photoinitiation process. Unenhanced Raman spectroscopy of monolayers at the air-water interface has met with limited success. In Chapter V, the design and implementation of a custom designed trough for air-water studies is discussed. This novel sample interface was developed to acquire spectra of monomolecular films at the air-water interface. Using total internal reflection sampling geometry and a leveling device to maintain constant water level, a spectrum of an arachidic acid monolayer film was obtained.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectRAMAN SPECTROSCOPY
dc.subjectRAMAN MICROSCOPY
dc.subjectRAMAN
dc.subjectAIR-WATER INTERFACE
dc.subjectA/W INTERFACE
dc.subjectFT-IR
dc.subjectHATR
dc.subjectATR
dc.subjectPHOSPHOLIPIDS
dc.subjectBIOMATERIALS
dc.subjectMEMBRANE-MIMETIC FILM
dc.subjectSURFACTANT PROTEINS
dc.subjectBIOMEMBRANES
dc.subjectVIBRATIONAL SPECTROSCOPY
dc.subjectPHOTOINITIATION
dc.subjectMETALLOCENES
dc.titleCharacterization of thin biological films by Raman and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy
dc.typeDissertation
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.description.departmentChemistry
dc.description.majorChemistry
dc.description.advisorRichard A. Dluhy
dc.description.committeeRichard A. Dluhy
dc.description.committeeCharles R. Kutal
dc.description.committeeMichael K. Johnson


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