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dc.contributor.authorMarbury, Leslie Catherine
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-03T21:18:45Z
dc.date.available2014-03-03T21:18:45Z
dc.date.issued2004-05
dc.identifier.othermarbury_leslie_c_200405_ms
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/marbury_leslie_c_200405_ms
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/21576
dc.description.abstractMany of the rivers and streams in Georgia are still not supporting their designated uses. Poor water quality reduces the productivity of water downstream. Water quality can be improved either by reducing loads from point and nonpoint sources or by increasing water for dilution. Reduction of loads from point sources has been the primary strategy for improving water quality, but this approach has not led the rivers and streams of Georgia to meeting the water quality standards. The Total Maximum Daily Load program is a key policy tool to address this problem. While the TMDLs written for impaired segments in Georgia address load reduction from point and nonpoint sources, the role of instream flow is not addressed as a management option. The purpose of this paper is to explore the economics of using enhanced flow as part of strategies to meet water quality targets.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectWater Quality
dc.subjectTMDLs
dc.subjectCost-Effective
dc.subjectInstream Flow
dc.titleThe economics of flow enhancements versus nutrient controls in meeting water quality standards
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMS
dc.description.departmentEnvironmental Economics
dc.description.majorEnvironmental Economics
dc.description.advisorAndrew G. Keeler
dc.description.committeeAndrew G. Keeler
dc.description.committeeJeff Mullen
dc.description.committeeDavid Gattie


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