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dc.contributor.authorLampman, Aaron Michael
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-03T21:18:07Z
dc.date.available2014-03-03T21:18:07Z
dc.date.issued2004-05
dc.identifier.otherlampman_aaron_m_200405_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/lampman_aaron_m_200405_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/21556
dc.description.abstractThe Tzeltal Maya of Highland Chiapas have extensive knowledge of wild mushrooms in the local ecosystem. This dissertation examines the totality of Tzeltal ethnomycological knowledge through an analysis of patterns of nomenclature and classification, knowledge of mushroom ecology, and beliefs about mushroom nutritional, medicinal, and toxic properties. Research was conducted in communities in the municipalities of Oxchuc and Tenejapa. Methods included mycological collection, semistructured interviews, pile sorts, triad tests, sentence substitution surveys and participant observation. The explanatory approach is ethnoecological, with a focus on the interaction between human cognition and domain features and how this interaction influences behavior. A total of 72 species were identified and are described herein. Of these, 30 species are utilized for food and medicine. The mushroom domain is perceived as a third kingdom that is independent of the plant and animal kingdoms. The kingdom includes two life-forms that are further subdivided into 4 covert complexes, and 51 folk genera, 4 of which are polytypic and include between 2 and 5 folk species. These categories are based on morphological similarities and dissimilarities, supporting the universal principles of folk classification as proposed by Berlin (1992). However, unique features of the mushroom domain such as small size, morphological similarity and toxicity make the use of mushrooms potentially dangerous. The Tzeltal deal with these features through the recognition of two special purpose folk categories based on utility that overlap and interact with the general purpose system of folk classification. Detailed ethnomycological knowledge is limited to species that are considered useful. Edible mushroom development is associated with the rainy season, a time when staple food supplies are low. Knowledge of the habitats, substrate preferences and tree associations of culturally important species is widespread. Linguistic designations are consistent only for useful species, and mushroom nomenclature is non-arbitrary, incorporating morphological features such as color, size, shape, and substrate preference. The strict separation of useful and useless species of mushrooms within the folk classification system provides guidelines for the safe use of macrofungi as biological resources, and influences the structure and substance of knowledge that is associated with each special purpose category.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectBiocultural diversity
dc.subjectBiodiversity
dc.subjectChiapas
dc.subjectClassification
dc.subjectCognitive anthropology
dc.subjectEcological anthropology
dc.subjectEcology
dc.subjectEthnobiology
dc.subjectEthnobotany
dc.subjectEthnoecology
dc.subjectEthnomycology
dc.subjectFolk biology
dc.subjectFolk classification
dc.subjectFungi
dc.subjectHighlands
dc.subjectHuman ecosystems
dc.subjectIndigenous knowledge
dc.subjectMacrofungi
dc.subjectMaya
dc.subjectMedical ethnobotany
dc.subjectMexico
dc.subjectMushroom
dc.subjectMushroom diversity
dc.subjectMushroom names
dc.subjectMushroom use
dc.subjectMycology
dc.subjectNomenclature
dc.subjectSubsistence
dc.subjectTraditional ecological knowledge
dc.subjectTseltal
dc.subjectTzeltal
dc.titleTzeltal ethnomycology
dc.title.alternativenaming, classification and use of mushrooms in the Highlands of Chiapas, Mexico
dc.typeDissertation
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.description.departmentAnthropology
dc.description.majorAnthropology
dc.description.advisorBrent Berlin
dc.description.committeeBrent Berlin
dc.description.committeeElois Ann Berlin
dc.description.committeeBen Blount
dc.description.committeeDavid Porter


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