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dc.contributor.authorRose, Ruth Ann
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-03T21:03:06Z
dc.date.available2014-03-03T21:03:06Z
dc.date.issued2003-08
dc.identifier.otherrose_ruth_a_200308_ms
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/rose_ruth_a_200308_ms
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/21150
dc.description.abstractHome-style jerky has grown in popularity over the past years because it is easy to prepare, lightweight, low fat, and tasty. However, during the 1980's and 1990's, several foodborne outbreaks, associated with home-style and small scale jerky processors, led people to re-examine the safety of the jerky making process. This thesis, addressed food safety issues related to Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, and Salmonella spp. on preparation of home-style beef jerky. Antimicrobial effects on of sugar and salt marinades were compared. Sodium chloride levels on the jerky process were investigated as the antimicrobial effect of a low and a regular salt level marinade were compared. Whether acid adapted cells have a higher survival rate than nonadapted cells was investigated. The type of marinade did not have an effect on physical properties. The survival of the acid-adapted and nonadapted cells were not significantly different.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectbeef jerky
dc.subjectacid adaptation
dc.subjectE. coliO157:H7
dc.subjectListeria monocytogenes
dc.subjectSalmonella
dc.subjectreduced salt
dc.subjectmarination
dc.titleFood safety issues and physical properties associated with home-style beef jerky
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMS
dc.description.departmentFood Science and Technology
dc.description.majorFood Science
dc.description.advisorMark Harrison
dc.description.committeeMark Harrison
dc.description.committeeJudy Harrison
dc.description.committeeYao-wen Huang


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