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dc.contributor.authorNagel, Alexander
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-03T21:02:38Z
dc.date.available2014-03-03T21:02:38Z
dc.date.issued2003-08
dc.identifier.othernagel_alexander_200308_ms
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/nagel_alexander_200308_ms
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/21127
dc.description.abstractMiniature inverted-repeat transposable elements (MITEs) are the single most abundant type of transposable element in the rice genome with at least 100 families and almost 100,000 elements. They are nonautonomous derivatives of DNA transposons. Little is known about how they spread and why they have been so successful. Availability of the entire rice genome sequence has permitted a whole genome analysis of five Tourist-like MITE families (Castaway, Explorer, Olo, Tou and Wanderer) in order to gain insight into their evolution. MITE sequences were found to cluster into distinct subfamilies ranging in age from around 1 million years to around 22 million years. These results suggest that MITEs spread through the rice genome in successive rounds of amplification. As part of this analysis transposon display was applied to these MITE families and 225 markers were mapped onto the 12 rice chromosomes.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectEvolution
dc.subjectGeorgia
dc.subjectMapping
dc.subjectMarker
dc.subjectMITE
dc.subjectTransposon
dc.subjectTransposon Display
dc.subjectRice
dc.subjectThesis
dc.titleTemporal waves of miniature inverted-repeat transposable element amplification during rice genome evolution
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMS
dc.description.departmentPlant Biology
dc.description.majorPlant Biology
dc.description.advisorSusan Wessler
dc.description.committeeSusan Wessler
dc.description.committeeMichael Scanlon
dc.description.committeeJohn McDonald


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