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dc.contributor.authorLinn, Kelly Kristine
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-03T21:02:11Z
dc.date.available2014-03-03T21:02:11Z
dc.date.issued2003-08
dc.identifier.otherlinn_kelly_k_200308_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/linn_kelly_k_200308_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/21103
dc.description.abstractAs Americans are consistently gaining weight and becoming more unhealthy, it is important that we begin to look at overweight audiences as unique. This project examined how audiences were formed around the non-popular medium of plus-size magazines and whether women were willing to be associated with media that does not have socially acceptable images, such as plus-size magazines. Though overweight women were attracted to plus-size magazines after they were introduced to it, they were also attracted to non-plus-size magazines as well. The results of this study suggest that many readers will use media at least in part to feel connected to a group to which they want to belong, as opposed to the group to which they actually belong.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectBody image
dc.subjectWomen
dc.subjectMedia uses and gratifications
dc.subjectPlus-size
dc.subjectMagazines
dc.subjectOverweight
dc.titleIs thin really in?
dc.title.alternativehow weight and body size influence college women's media use
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMA
dc.description.departmentMass Communication
dc.description.majorMass Communication
dc.description.advisorAnn Hollifield
dc.description.committeeAnn Hollifield
dc.description.committeeCarolina Acosta-Alzuru
dc.description.committeeDwight Brooks


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