Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorFranchi, Jaimie Lauren
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-03T21:00:58Z
dc.date.available2014-03-03T21:00:58Z
dc.date.issued2003-08
dc.identifier.otherfranchi_jaimie_l_200308_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/franchi_jaimie_l_200308_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/21042
dc.description.abstractAs an anthropologist and writer of fiction, Zora Neale Hurston worked frequently with folklore; many of the projects on which she worked involved the collection and analysis of folktales and other folk art. Due to her career and her own personal background, her novels and short stories were heavily influenced by folklore and also by the largely oral culture from which she collected the tales. This paper will first set out to examine how folklore and orality function in Hurston’s literature, and then determine that they not only to enhance the artistic quality of her work, but also as allow Hurston to examine and break down cultural hierarchies involving literature and folklore, writing and orality, and formal and "folk" education.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightsOn Campus Only
dc.subjectZora Neale Hurston
dc.subjectFolklore
dc.subjectHigh Art
dc.subjectLow Art
dc.subjectTheir Eyes Were Watching God
dc.subjectMules and Men
dc.titleWorking beyond cultural hierarchies
dc.title.alternativethe fiction and folklore of Zora Neale Hurston
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMA
dc.description.departmentEnglish
dc.description.majorEnglish
dc.description.advisorValerie Babb
dc.description.committeeValerie Babb
dc.description.committeeTimothy Powell
dc.description.committeeTricia Lootens


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record