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dc.contributor.authorWalker, Jessica Anne
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-03T20:27:35Z
dc.date.available2014-03-03T20:27:35Z
dc.date.issued2003-05
dc.identifier.otherwalker_jessica_a_200305_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/walker_jessica_a_200305_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/20941
dc.description.abstractAs the titles of Shakespeare's Richard III, Macbeth, King Lear, Coriolanus, and Antony and Cleopatra would suggest, political authority in these plays rests largely with a man in power, a warrior or a king; however, the influence wielded by women is often overlooked. My intent is to explore issues of political power in Shakespeare's women: how they shape their environments, their circumstances, and their men. While their gender does not prevent them from seeking power, it is nevertheless a significant issue in that power is often gained through relationships (through men, over men), through the enactment of gender-specific roles (wife, mother, daughter, lover) and gendered behaviors (feminine seduction, manly assertion). By taking their allegedly weak stations and exploiting them for gain, these women re-create themselves and the men around them, often paying a reciprocal price for what they have won.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectthe queen: political power in shakespeare\'s women
dc.title"Not he, the queen"
dc.title.alternativepolitical power in Shakespeare's women
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMA
dc.description.departmentEnglish
dc.description.majorEnglish
dc.description.advisorFreer
dc.description.committeeFreer
dc.description.committeeFran Teague
dc.description.committeeElizabeth Kraft


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