Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorVan Wynsberghe, Amy Marie
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-03T20:27:30Z
dc.date.available2014-03-03T20:27:30Z
dc.date.issued2003-05
dc.identifier.othervan_wynsberghe_amy_m_200305_ms
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/van_wynsberghe_amy_m_200305_ms
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/20938
dc.description.abstractSubsequent to experiencing sexual victimization, many survivors report self-blame for the incident. Two subtypes of self-blame, characterological and behavioral, have been examined. Undergraduate college women with a history of sexual victimization and experienced recent unwanted sexual contact reported their levels of self-blame, details of the assault, and psychological functioning (prior to the assault). Situational and psychological predictors for characterological and behavioral self-blame were examined Results suggest that prior psychological functioning is a stronger predictor of self-blame than situational factors. Implications for psychological treatment and risk-reduction programs are discussed.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectSexual assault
dc.subjectSelf-blame
dc.titleSelf-blame following a recent sexual assault
dc.title.alternativepredictors in women with a history of sexual victimization
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMS
dc.description.departmentPsychology
dc.description.majorPsychology
dc.description.advisorKaren S. Calhoun
dc.description.committeeKaren S. Calhoun
dc.description.committeeJoan Jackson
dc.description.committeeLily McNair


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record