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dc.contributor.authorPopp, Jacqueline R.
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-03T20:26:33Z
dc.date.available2014-03-03T20:26:33Z
dc.date.issued2003-05
dc.identifier.otherpopp_jacqueline_r_200305_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/popp_jacqueline_r_200305_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/20891
dc.description.abstractThis paper examines the impact of employees’ perceptions of social vulnerability within the workplace on self-referral to employee assistance programs (EAPs), controlling for both individual and company level characteristics. Overall, support is found for the hypothesis that employees belonging to groups likely to have greater perceptions of social vulnerability within the company, as indicated by racial/ethnic background, educational attainment, occupational position, and income, are less likely to self-refer than their counterparts less likely to perceive themselves as being socially vulnerable, net of company level variables. Additionally, certain company level variables support the hypothesis that the context of the company matters for self-referral. Theoretical and policy implications of the findings are discussed.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectEmployee assistance programs
dc.subjectSelf-referral
dc.subjectSocial Vulnerability
dc.subjectWorkplace
dc.titleDifferences in self-referral to employee assistance programs : does social vulnerability in the workplace matter?
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMA
dc.description.departmentSociology
dc.description.majorSociology
dc.description.advisorThomas L. McNulty
dc.description.committeeThomas L. McNulty
dc.description.committeePaul M. Roman
dc.description.committeeLinda A. Renzulli


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