Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorSnyder, Abigail Lynne
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-03T20:22:19Z
dc.date.available2014-03-03T20:22:19Z
dc.date.issued2002-12
dc.identifier.othersnyder_abigail_l_200212_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/snyder_abigail_l_200212_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/20677
dc.description.abstractEvidence of the sociological importance of television and body dissatisfaction and their relationship is presented, combining social psychological and communication theories. This study is an attempt to apply a framework of cultivation theory to body dissatisfaction. Three aspects of body dissatisfaction are explored: body shame, drive for thinness, and drive for muscularity. A survey is constructed to measure amount of television watched, television and social comparison, and salience of weight in family of origin; and data was collected from 370 undergraduates. Gender effects (resonance in cultivation theory) are posited and not supported. Cultivation theory is not supported. The amount of television watched did not have a significant effect on measures of body dissatisfaction. Cultivation theory appears insensitive to the social factors that have the most effect on the experience of body dissatisfaction. Social comparison, dieting, and family relations were found to be important influences on body dissatisfaction.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectCultivation Theory
dc.subjectBody Dissatisfaction
dc.subjectTelevision
dc.subjectMedia
dc.subjectBody Image,
dc.titleThe effect of television on body dissatisfaction
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMA
dc.description.departmentSociology
dc.description.majorSociology
dc.description.advisorLinda Grant
dc.description.committeeLinda Grant
dc.description.committeeJody Clay-Warner
dc.description.committeeDavid Smilde


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record