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dc.contributor.authorDurley, Jaime Rae
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-03T20:08:18Z
dc.date.available2014-03-03T20:08:18Z
dc.date.issued2002-05
dc.identifier.otherdurley_jaime_r_200205_ms
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/durley_jaime_r_200205_ms
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/20535
dc.description.abstractSubjective states of awareness surrounding a memory trace often provide indications of the memory’s veracity and should be fairly immune to external influence. In three experiments, bogus information ostensibly reflecting a previous participant’s remember and know responses were provided to participants in order to determine the extent to which social conformity operates in a source-monitoring framework. Participants’ own claims of remembering and knowing were influenced by this information. Additionally, the diagnosticity of the sources used at encoding affected the degree of conformity. The results imply that when accurate feedback is provided, participants report experiencing greater recollective details and display improved memory performance.
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectSource Monitoring
dc.subjectResponse Conformity
dc.subjectSocial Conformity
dc.subjectSubjective Awareness
dc.subjectAutonoetic Memory
dc.subjectNoetic Memory
dc.titleMemory as a social process : source monitoring and response conformity
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMS
dc.description.departmentPsychology
dc.description.majorPsychology
dc.description.advisorRichard L. Marsh
dc.description.committeeRichard L. Marsh
dc.description.committeeZachary C. Estes
dc.description.committeeRobert Mahan


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