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dc.contributor.authorHaines, Marc Nicholas
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-03T20:01:29Z
dc.date.available2014-03-03T20:01:29Z
dc.date.issued2001-08
dc.identifier.otherhaines_marc_n_200108_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/haines_marc_n_200108_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/20212
dc.description.abstractEnterprise Systems (ES) - also often referred to Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems - are at the core of the IS portfolios of many, especially large, organizations. ES implementations are enormous and costly undertakings, often entailing considerable organizational changes. While some organizations have realized substantial benefits from ES implementations, there have also been many disappointments and costly failures. The configuration and customization activities related to adapting a generic ES software package to the particular requirements of an organization is an important part of the implementation process and can take up a considerable amount of time and resources. This specialization of generic IS components also has important and potentially costly implications on future upgrades and the maintenance of the overall information system. | The purpose of this study is to provide a conceptual framework for specializations of IS components and explore the factors that influence these specializations. A particular emphasis is put on the relationship between information system component specialization and organizational competitive strategy. Empirical evidence from five cases is used to support the framework developed in this study. The evidence was collected from 23 interviews, correspondence, and documents. The analysis of the data was performed using the qualitative research tool NVivo. | The results suggests that the strategic importance of an IS component should be considered a key factor, in combination with other factors, in determining the type and degree of specialization of an IS component. The results are used to offer practitioners a framework for guiding their IS component specialization efforts and to provide researchers with a basis for future research on this topic.
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightsOn Campus Only
dc.subjectEnterprise Systems
dc.subjectEnterprise Resource Planning
dc.subjectIS Implementation
dc.subjectStrategic Alignment
dc.subjectOrganizational Strategy
dc.subjectSpecialization
dc.titleEffective enterprise system implementation
dc.title.alternativealigning information system components with organizational strategy
dc.typeDissertation
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.description.departmentBusiness
dc.description.majorBusiness Administration
dc.description.advisorDale L. Goodhue
dc.description.committeeDale L. Goodhue
dc.description.committeeHugh J. Watson
dc.description.committeeRobert P. Bostrom
dc.description.committeeWilliam Lewis, Jr.
dc.description.committeeWalter D. Potter


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