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dc.contributor.authorFerland, Christopheren_US
dc.contributor.authorWolfe, Kent L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDoherty, Brigid A.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-03-10T21:25:03Z
dc.date.available2011-03-10T21:25:03Z
dc.date.issued2001-05en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/18783
dc.description.abstractVegetable production in the South-central region of Georgia proves to be a successful alternative venture for many producers. The switch to vegetable production from row cropping appears easy due the infrastructure and lay out of the land. Most of the switched land already has irrigation processes in place and similar equipment. One big issue associated with large-scale vegetable production is its labor-intensive nature during planting and harvesting. Both of these tasks require numerous hands, which presently are tough to come by in Georgia. Georgia’s migrant labor is underpowered and quickly moving. The smaller vegetable producer may not face the same labor problems as the larger produces but face other problems like difficulty in marketing. Many of Georgia’s vegetable processors, wholesalers, retailers, and distributors tend to purchase in large quantities. As a result small farmers are unable to produce the quantities desired by these consumers. Fortunately, Georgia’s population prefers to purchase Georgia grown and local and state grown fruits and vegetables to the commercial store brands given similar quantity and price. Consumer preference for Georgia grown produce provides a marketing opportunity to small farmers. One such opportunity is selling direct to the consumer at a farmers market.en_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Georgiaen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCenter Reports;CR-01-25en_US
dc.relation.urihttp://www.caed.uga.edu/publications/2001/pdf/CR-01-25.pdfen_US
dc.titleThe potential for a farmers market in Leesburg, Georgiaen_US


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