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dc.contributor.authorRisse, L. Marken_US
dc.contributor.authorJarrin, Veronicaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-11-12T14:53:18Z
dc.date.available2010-11-12T14:53:18Z
dc.date.issued2009-05-14en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/12073
dc.description.abstractIn 2004, the Georgia General Assembly passed and the governor signed House Bill 579, which required all permitted irrigation withdrawals in Georgia to be metered by 2009, depending on available funds. Farmers are continually trying to manage their irrigation systems to increase yields and improve the quality of food and fiber. Some management examples include end gun shut-offs (repaired or installed), uniformity tests, installing new sprinkler packages and improved irrigation methods. Each of these methods help improve the system, reduce costs and distribute more of the pumped water to the growing crop. The agricultural water meter also can be used for improved yields while conserving water.en_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Georgiaen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesBulletin;1242-7en_US
dc.titleBacterial Source Tracking (BST)en_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameUniversity of Georgia. College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciencesen_US


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